John Hubert Doty:
His Biography

 

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Biography

Top of Page

His Birth

Schooling

Great Depression

Army Air Corp Life
Marriage And Family Life
John And Genealogy
His Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America

The Sowards and Tipsword Families

Pioneer Families of Colonial America

 

 

 

Home

Biography

Top of Page

His Birth

Schooling

Great Depression

Army Air Corp Life
Marriage And Family Life
John And Genealogy
His Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America

The Sowards and Tipsword Families

Pioneer Families of Colonial America

 

 

 

Home

Biography

Top of Page

His Birth

Schooling

Great Depression

Army Air Corp Life
Marriage And Family Life
John And Genealogy
His Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America

The Sowards and Tipsword Families

Pioneer Families of Colonial America

 

 

 

 

Home

Biography

Top of Page

His Birth

Schooling

Great Depression

Army Air Corp Life
Marriage And Family Life
John And Genealogy
His Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America

The Sowards and Tipsword Families

Pioneer Families of Colonial America

 

 

 

Home

Biography

Top of Page

His Birth

Schooling

Great Depression

Army Air Corp Life
Marriage And Family Life
John And Genealogy
His Death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America

The Sowards and Tipsword Families

Pioneer Families of Colonial America

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Hubert Doty was born on October 22, 1914 in a log cabin two miles south and three-sixteenths of a mile west of Beecher City, Illinois. It was two weeks and one day after his father's 40th birthday.

His Birth

On the afternoon of that day, his grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Logue Doty and his great-aunt, Sarah Ann Grubaugh Doty, arrived at the home of his parents to help in the birthing. They had decided to act as midwives and save his father a doctor's bill.

The weather was foul that day and night. It turned cold and started to snow. Soon, the wind came up and there developed a ground blizzard. The cattle began to seek shelter in the timber and draws. The snow began drifting and covering them. As the time drew near, the storm became worse and the mid-wives became over-anxious about his arrival. Soon, the suspense became too great and the sent his father out into the cold, dark, windy night after the doctor. He had to go east for a quarter of a mile, which was not difficult, and then two miles due north into the blizzard. Upon his arrival at Dr. J. F. Caldwell's office in Beecher City, he was covered with ice and snow. But he and the doctor set out at once for the Doty home. Since they were traveling south, with the wind at their backs, the trip was not as painful.

Meanwhile, snug at home, out of the storm, the appointed time arrived and the mid-wives did their job with petticoats flying as John Hubert Doty backed his way into the world. As his father and Dr. J. F. Caldwell approached the log cabin, they heard the baby's wails above the thundering storm. In a way, this disappointed the doctor for he seemed to have lost a fee. As he sat around the hot pot-bellied stove, dreading his return trip, he decided to send the bill to the grandmother for sending the father out into such a storm. It took some talking on the part of the father to convince the doctor to leave his customary bill. Dr. Caldwell died in 1927.

John Hubert Doty was called "Hubert" or "Hub" (pronounced H-you-b) by his family as he was growing up. This was due to the fact that he shared a first name with his father, who was always called "John."

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Schooling

Young Hubert attended kindergarten school at Pleasant Hill, also known as the Force and later the Tipsword school, which is located two miles south of Beecher City, Illinois. He attended the public grade and high school at Kellyville, Oklahoma and transferred during his senior year to St. Elmo High School. In June, 1952, he entered the University of Denver in Denver Colorado and received his Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration (with a major in Public Administration) on 10 June 1955.

His grade school teachers at Kellyville were: Lucy West, primary; Mary Gerachty, 1st grade; Iness Jones, 2nd grade; Vera Massey, 3rd grade; Mary Jackson, 4th grade; Genevee Holcum, 5th grade; Laura Nay, 6th grade; and frank Burgess, 7th and 8th grades.

When he lived in Oklahoma, he lived on the Creek and Euchie Indian reservation. They lived two miles west of the school house, down a long dirt road. When it rained, the road was mud, mud, and more mud. When it was dry, the dust was ankle deep in places. If it rained, young Hubert was wet when he arrived at school. He would sit in his wet clothes till they dried sometime during the day.

Because of these conditions, he did not start school until he was eight years old. After a year at school, he was told that school was out. Young Hubert went home joyous. He thought he would never have to go again. He was surprised when September came and he had to start again. He severely disliked his primary teacher, Lucy West. She wore black dresses and looked like a witch to him. Still, his father kept him in school until the eighth grade. After that, he needed no extra encouragement. By the time he had reached third grade, over half of his class had dropped out of school. In his Sophomore class, there were 15 students -- three of whom came from other districts. When he started in primary class there were 40-45 students. He believed that the teachers encouraged the students to leave by beating the h*** out of them.

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Great Depression

During the Great Depression, he lived on his family's farm. It took longer for the depression to hit them. Cattle dropped from $100 a head to $10 a head. Horses went from $150 each to $35 each. Hogs, if they could be sold at all, were only about 90% of what they brought just a few years earlier. Cotten went from 22 cents a bushel to 10 cents.

He stayed in school until 1935. From 1935 until February of 1936, he spent time being a hobo and going around the country.

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Army and Army Air Corp

In February, 1936, he entered the Army. He entered as a Private and worked as a "mule-skinner" and handler from 1936 until 1939 in Fort Sheridan, Illinois. In March of 1938, he was transferred to Manila in the Philippine Islands. He stayed there until December of 1938, when he left the Philippines. Many of the men that he knew in the Philippines wound up on the Bataan Death March. In December of 1938, he left the Army and went into the reserves. In September of 1939, he was in the Army Air Corp. From September of 1939 until June 1941, he was a Staff Sergeant at Selfridge Field, Mt. Clems, Michigan. From June 1941 to December 1941, he was assigned to Bear Field, Fort Wayne, Indiana. After Pearl Harbor, his group went to Muroc, California. Then, he and a cadre of others went back to Selfridge. From there he went to Syracuse, New York as a Warrant Officer, Junior Grade, where he went to Blackstone, Virginia and helped to close the Base there. Then, he went to Oscoda, Michigan and helped close that base. From there, he went to Selfrige. From August of 1942 to November of 1945, he was in the Training Command, instructing American and French pilots. In November, 1945, he went to Greensboro, North Carolina working in Military Intelligence and in January 1946, he arrived in Wiesbaden, Germany.

He was flown as a litter patient from Frankfurt-on-the-Main, Germany to Fitzsimons Army Hospital during February, 1947. He retired from the Army Air Corp in June 1947. He was released from the hospital in August of 1950.

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Marriage and Family Life

It was at Fitzsimons Army Hospital that he met and married Alice Therese Kelley. She was an Army Nurse. Alice was an Irish Canadian, who had become a naturalized citizen of the United States and then had served in World War II. They were married on 10 September 1949. Early in their marriage, the Korean War required that Alice again become an active member of the armed services. She was a veteran of two wars: World War II and the Korean War. Her children kept her from going to Korea itself. So, she served stateside.

John and Alice had two children. The first was Mary Ann Doty. She was born on 21 October 1951, one day before her father's 37th birthday. The second child was John Bernard Doty. He was born on 12 February 1954. Until his grandfather's death in 1962, there were three John Doty's. One of John Hubert's favorite pictures was of the three John's taken in 1958. The three John's were all born roughly 40 years apart -- 1874, 1914, and 1954.

Alice died in 1982. She was ill for over a year with cancer. John Hubert and John Bernard took care of her in this last year of her life. Because of their care, her wish to stay at home as long as possible and stay out of the hospital for as long as possible was fulfilled. She went into the hospital on Friday, 8 October 1982 and she died early Thursday morning on 14 October 1982. For the rest of his life, John Hubert missed her and mourned her death.

MaryAnn married Michael N. Rizzo, Jr. on 3 October 1981. In 1987, John Hubert became a grandfather when MaryAnn and Mike adopted their first child -- John Michael Rizzo, whom they call Jack. In 1990, John Hubert's second grandchild was born on 12 April and adopted on 10 May. Mike and MaryAnn named him Peter Vincent.

John Bernard married Suzanne. In 1990, six days after Mike and MaryAnn picked up Peter, Suzanne gave birth to Andrew Preston Doty, John Hubert's third grandson.

John Hubert wrote the following in one of his books: "I try to treat my grandchildren with kindness and forethought -- being good to them. Yes, spoil them if I get a chance. I want them to remember me as a kind person." They do. Even four years after his death, they speak of him with respect, awe, and love. He succeeded in this effort very well.

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John and Genealogy

John Hubert became interest in the history of his family in the 1930s. In the summer of 1934, his grandmother, Mary E. Doty, gave him a copy of the Doty Family history to read. It was written by John W. Dowty of Eagle Creek, Oregon. His daughter could not find a copy of this information when she looked in 2002. However, the material impressed John Hubert.

He started his research on the families in July 1954 and continued until his death in 1998. He believed that the story of our ancestors was America's way of creating a usable past, since we had none here and had given up what we did have in whatever country we came from.

After much research, he published his first book Pioneer Families of Colonial America in 1977. He published his second book The Vancel and Lyerly Families in America in 1980. He published a revised edition of the book in 1991. In 1992, he published his third book, The Sowards and Tipsword Families in America. All of these books he sold to people who were interested in the family histories. In 1994, for his immediate family only, he printed a revised edition of Pioneer Families of Colonial America. Although he always said he would have it printed, he never did. There was always "one more piece of information" to track down and verify.

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His Death

On 23 October 1998, John Hubert Doty gave up his struggle on this Earth and went to be with his wife and many of his family and friends who had died. He left behind his children, his grandchildren, and many friends.

His daughter, MaryAnn Doty Rizzo, received his papers and the copies of his books. After a period of grief, she has decided to publish the revised "final" editions that her father always talked about in honor of his memory. This site is part of that effort.

This is a brief summary of his life. More information can be found in the three different books that he wrote.

 

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Last updated 24 August 2002 © 2002